Renee

Being catty, signing contracts and something bizarre

If you’ve been feeling hot this week, spare a thought for me.  I adopted an eight month old kitten at the weekend and had to sign a contract with the cat sanctuary that I won’t have windows or doors open for four weeks.  Yes… Four weeks!!

Charlie needs time to settle in properly before being introduced to my garden, with its nest of pretty (but spiteful) robins and an influx of neighbourhood cats. I think they remember that my old cat flap was broken and allowed them in to sneakily grab food that wasn’t theirs.

Imaginative Training | social media blog | social media training | Plain English training | Plain English editing | copywritingThe cat sanctuary in Waltham Abbey was amazing, but heartbreaking. I would have taken more cats but my circumstances don’t allow it right now. An allergic boyfriend and future daughter-in-law means that I’m limited to hypo-allergenic breeds, so it was lucky that Charlie popped up.

It was interesting that I had to sign a contract. It had all sorts of stipulations, some enforceable, others less so. It reminded me that the lawyer who kindly drew up new contracts for me a couple of months ago is probably getting frustrated that I haven’t implemented them yet.

I will do.  Up until now I have provided social media services following discussions with the clients and ongoing reviews. I have never tied anyone in to a minimum service period, although I always explain that you need to allow at least a year to show return on investment. Some people just want a six-month push to get them up and running, and that’s fine.

I saw various contracts of historical importance last week at the Churchill War Rooms. It’s a fantastic museum that I’d never heard of until last year; the underground bunker where the cabinet operated during the war. Hundreds of people lived and worked there, just metres below the city, in a capsule world that no-one else knew existed. Decisions were made, strategies were implemented and a small cat wandered the halls waiting for Churchill to tickle his tummy.

One exceptional airman that fought in the war that Churchill led is Air Commodore Charles Clarke OBE.  I’ve written about this delightful man before (flying-in-a-spitfire-the-finest-banquet-in-london-and-ladies-in-not-many-clothes/) and was so pleased to see him again last week at a reception held at the Ministry of Defence. We were launching the 2018 Soldiering On Awards to recognise outstanding and inspirational members of the military family. Air Commodore Clarke has won one, as have many incredible people – and animals! (No cats yet, though.)

Aside from politics and military leadership, Churchill was a wonderful artist and writer.  One of his best quotes (in my opinion) is: “If you’re going through hell, keep going.”  Charles Clarke was going through hell when he was shot down and captured by the enemy. He was one of the brave men portrayed in The Great Escape who battled his way to freedom. Another Churchill quote that’s appropriate for then and now is, “Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.”

It sure is. If you know of anyone who deserves recognition, please consider nominating them for one of these prestigious awards.  Nominations open shortly – you can check out the categories here.

Determined to find a military-themed song more cheerful than Billy don’t be a hero (which Sharon and I sang repeatedly throughout our childhood), I googled and this came up in Spinditty’s songs about soldiers and veterans: 8th of November by Big and Rich.  It’s the true story of Niles Harris, a 19-year-old boy from Deadwood, South Dakota, who hugged his mother goodbye as he left home for the army to fight in the Vietnam War. Just a few months later, on November 8, 1965, he encountered an epic battle in which 48 of his fellow soldiers died. Niles was injured, but fortunately survived.

The reason this touched me is that 8th November is my birthday! Touching. bizarre and more than a teeny bit creepy. Do you have a song about the day you were born? Even if you’re not a fan of country music, the video is worth watching. The lyrics aren’t overly cheerful, so I’ll simply quote… “Saw the eagle fly through a clear blue sky; 1965, the eighth of November.”

Creeped me out, but on the plus side there’s no excuse for you not wishing me happy birthday this year, haha! You can do that here: @WeekendWitch.

Being queenly, courageous people and the inspirational animal vote

Marion’s daughter once gave me a fridge magnet that says ‘Don’t treat me any differently than you would the Queen.’ It’s good advice, and last week Philip took it. We spent the weekend in a fabulous Tudor castle, in the very room where Henry VIII slept with his doomed wife Anne Boleyn.

Encased within a sumptuous four poster bed, with a log fire roaring on the opposite side of the octagonal room, champagne sparkling in crystal goblets, truffles (quickly eaten) and a very large bouquet gracing the central table, it was easy to imagine we were royalty.

A wonderful tour guide explained the castle’s turbulent history before we settled down to a very large afternoon tea, complete with clotted cream and jam scones, and five cakes each. (Yes, that’s not a typo.) No sooner had we recovered from all that than we dined on a sumptuous seven-course meal. So to say I felt spoiled during the trip is an understatement.  (To say I felt sick is another…)

Imaginative Training | social media blog | social media training | Plain English training | Plain English editing | copywritingMy close friends know that I’ve had an interest in Anne Boleyn since early childhood, although Philip didn’t know that when he booked. It added another dimension to the weekend to know I slept in her room.  I thought it was actually their bed, but apparently 500-year-old beds have bedbugs, so I’m guessing a luxury hotel chain purchased new ones at some point.

This was a couple of days after a reception at the House of Lords to honour the finalists of this year’s Soldiering On Awards. The House, otherwise known as the Palace of Westminster, was built 1000 years ago. 1001 to be exact! The elaborate building we know stems from the mid-19th century, following a fire that destroyed the original palace. However, the medieval Great Hall survived intact, so it’s likely that both Anne and I walked through there.  My MP arranged a wonderful tour a couple of years ago for the boys and me – until then we hadn’t realised that UK residents are entitled to visit free of charge, bypassing the £25.50 entrance fee.

Anyway, the reception was held in a lovely terraced room overlooking the river, with Taittinger champagne flowing throughout the evening to toast the inspirational finalists. We celebrated their individual journeys and wished them luck for the award ceremony and banquet on 24th March. (Tickets are still available here if you’d like to join us.)

f7661868c1c6ca4c16aa432bb4738209Two of the award categories are being voted for by members of the public – a People’s Choice Award that showcases some truly amazing people, and an Animal Partner Award for an exceptional animal that has carried out duties to make the lives easier in some way for members of the military family. If you have a spare minute, please take a quick look and cast your vote for the one you most admire.

One of my favourite songs from one of my favourite films, with simple lyrics that transcend time. “Did you ever know that you’re my hero and everything I would like to be? I can fly higher than an eagle, for you are the wind beneath my wings.”

Some of the courageous people being honoured at the House of Lords may not have chosen to be ‘heroes’ but deserve the recognition nonetheless.  We can all fly, whether we’re the eagle or the driving wind; we just sometimes need to be reminded to spread our wings a little wider than normal and remember that the future’s what we make it. Then trust ourselves to make it a good one.

If you’d like to know more about the Soldiering On Awards, drop me an email – or ask me here: @WeekendWitch.