Renee

Tips for blending your business and personal Facebook profiles

Using social media in a personal context can still lead to business opportunities, if it’s handled sensibly. And nothing happens by chance, so we should always be prepared for someone to check us out online at any time.

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As an example, I recently met Ade, a celebrity events planner who has masqueraded around the homes of some top A-listers. We connected on LinkedIn, naturally, then – as we have a number of shared social contacts – he added me as a Facebook friend.

Now, I don’t keep my personal Facebook account particularly professional; this is my forum for staying in touch with friends and family.  It’s littered with art gallery pics, trips to the theatre, a few cat photos (yes, I am that crazy lady) and the occasional chocolate delight. My business Facebook page is the place for you to get social media and communication skills tips. Still, although Facebook is my social space, I try to avoid posting nonsense. After all, you never know when an international radio show producer will find you.

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Anyway, Ade invited me to join him at a recording of a London radio show for an Australian station, which is why I found myself in a quaint Bloomsbury theatre-cum-art gallery with an eclectic mix of British stage stars and recording artists – including Robbie Williams’ backing singer, the original female lead in the West End’s Phantom of the Opera and the legendary Freddie Mercury’s partner, Peter Straker.

But the masterpiece that blew me metaphorically to Melbourne and back was Aussie pianist Warren Wills, the radio show’s host, who belted out such an incredible Bowie compilation on the grand piano that goosebumps completed a Mexican wave all over my body. I didn’t tweet any of this at the time because I was glued there, mesmerised, but you can hear the performance on a podcast. Such nice people. Such enviable talent.

At the same event, the sister of one of my 80’s musical heroes approached me to help market her novel – a historical rhyming book that I haven’t yet read but will be downloading from Amazon before we meet next week to talk about a marketing campaign.

A second instance of a personal social media connection concerns another gallery and a different group of artists. My friend and colleague Martyn Royce took me to the launch of his summer exhibition at a contemporary gallery in Pall Mall. Momentarily standing alone to sip my champagne, a man started chatting to me, and – to cut an hour’s conversation into a snippet of a sentence – we ended up as Facebook friends.

Although he lives 150 miles away, social media showed that he was born in my town and – this was really quite unbelievable – he’d actually lived in my road and played with my neighbour as a child!  He’s now a leatherworker who does Viking re-enactments, demonstrating his craft at country shows up and down the UK; pretty cool.

A couple of days later I was at the V&A’s Frida Kahlo exhibition with my friend Caroline, coincidentally my neighbour’s sister – and she remembered him well. I’m putting them all in touch with each other as I write – multitasking at its best.

So, one week, two new Facebook friends, three galleries, a lot of fun and doors opening to new business opportunities.  Can’t be bad, eh?

Do remember though, your personal Facebook page shouldn’t be your business façade. Here are a few tips for managing it sensibly for business.

Top Tips

  • Only accept people as friends if you know them or can see a tangible connection.
  • If you want to keep business and social strictly separate, it’s absolutely fine – and not rude – to refer people to your business page and explain that you keep your personal profile for family and close friends.
  • Blend your personal and business pages when appropriate, share business updates and vice versa, but delineate the line between professional and fun.
  • Review your personal profile settings regularly to ensure only people you want to see your personal information can access it.
  • Avoid sharing negative personal updates. While some people use this tactic for engaging with friends, it’s not good practice if you’re hoping to be seen by current or future clients.
  • Don’t include ridiculous or drunken photos, swearing or anything else that falls into the realms of unprofessionalism.

Yell if you need any help with your Facebook presence!

Would you like to join me for a glass of wine? (And a free LinkedIn review!)

If you’re free on Thursday, 1st March, please join me at the Art Pavilion in east London for the private viewing of “In a country far, far away.”

There will be some awesome works of art, live music, wine and dance displays – so it will be wonderful if you can come along!

This exhibition has been inspired by tales from countries in war and crisis. My exhibit is a poem dedicated to the first recorded poet – a remarkable woman who lived over 4,500 years ago in the area now known as southern Iraq. Her work has survived almost five millennia, yet I’d never even heard of her until recently! Just think… her message spread across the globe and made a lasting impact without even a whisper of wifi…

While I won’t be giving out social media tips on the night (apart from reminding people to tweet, share and Instagram their favourite pieces of artwork, of course), I will be happy to follow up with a complimentary LinkedIn review for anyone who comes along as a result of reading this blog!

Here are the details, and I really hope you can make it!

If there’s anything specific you’d like to know about making the most of LinkedIn – or any social media – but you can’t make it on March 1st, please feel free to ask.

Looking forward to – hopefully – seeing you there!

Giacometti, calm waters and a bicycle made for two

There are few things lovelier on a gloriously warm day than creating a cool breeze by cycling leisurely through the countryside. It’s even better with the beautiful sparkling waters of Rutland on your left. One thing I do think is lovelier is not having to work your thigh muscles and burn your calves – a usual side effect of the cycling culture.  However, I have found the solution!

Imaginative Training | social media blog | social media training | Plain English training | Plain English editing | copywritingPhilip suggested touring around the edge of the lake… on a tandem! It’s great fun. He was awesome, pecs rippling as he worked so hard to masterfully control the huge contraption. He took us riding through shady glens and across grassy spaces full of picnickers and small children – whose parents seemed to think it was cute to allow their offspring to toddle dangerously into the path of oncoming bikes and skateboards. Climbing the steeper hills, Philip even stood up to peddle – very impressive, which I assumed was the reason for the playful display.  Turns out it’s the only way to get up the hill if the person behind is sitting there enjoying the ride instead of actually pedaling…

He told me that now I have mastered staying on the seat, the next step will be to learn how to move my feet.  We’ll see.

We’d intended to spend the day sailing, but a calm water meant the sails wouldn’t be very effective, so we abandoned that idea in favour of the tandem. It made me think of my nana singing Daisy Daisy when I was very young – and now that I’ve typed that it’s going round and round in my head again. (And for some reason, so is the rude version.) In truth, I did contribute significantly to the pedalling and part of my body that shall remain unmentionable in this ladylike blog is still sore – so I guess it’s appropriate to still be singing a cycling song three days after the event.  Annoyingly, I didn’t have my recently-purchased magic cycling knickers with me, which was a huge shame.

Rutland Water is so clear and blue, it’s almost a picture book lake. In contrast, the Thames is a dismal grey colour. Far less pretty but still attractive as it snakes its way through the best city in the world. Have you seen the Giacometti exhibition at the Tate Modern? I hadn’t really fancied going, but Martyn wanted to go, and I was tempted by the thought of a cake on the members’ balcony overlooking the aforementioned watery artery of my home town.

It was all the more enjoyable because I wasn’t bothered about Giacometti so hadn’t thought about what to expect. I went with an open mind and returned blown away by the diversity of this Swiss artist’s work. Sculptures towering over me at around 10ft were displayed alongside teeny tiny bronze sculptures smaller than my thumbnail.  Really!  It’s all quite fascinating.

Imaginative Training | social media blog | social media training | Plain English training | Plain English editing | copywritingBut more worthy of a visit is the new exhibition in a large hall at the other end of the concourse: Soul of a Nation: art in the age of black power. This incredible collection of work celebrates black American artists from 1963-83, during the turbulent days of political and social change, following on a huge surfing wave from the impact of the Civil Rights Movement.

One of the things I love about my art gallery memberships is being introduced to artists I’d never heard of before. There were loads here, and their individual artworks, while obviously socially and culturally important – both historically as well as maintaining a global relevance today – are masterpieces in their own right. I’ve never seen such a long queue at the Tate – or certainly not noticed one before – even for the Hockney show.

Imaginative Training | social media blog | social media training | Plain English training | Plain English editing | copywritingThis is a popular exhibition, and rightly so. It actually inspired me to do something more creative at my life drawing class this week. But sadly, I forgot. Stuck to a 3B pencil and my trusted purple and turquoise felt tips. Oh well. My own artistic revolution is clearly still to come. Something to look forward to, I guess.

As Freddie said, “I don’t believe in Peter Pan, Frankenstein or Superman; all I wanna do is…” You can fill in the blank yourself.

If you need help to fill in any business blanks – particularly social media-related, drop me an email – or ask me here:@WeekendWitch.

Making videos, time out in London and gifts arriving from happy clients

This is a typical day working in London, as mine panned out last Wednesday.  Travelling into town on the underground… The guy on my left was playing with a DJ mixdeck app – loud tinny bass and backbeat pounding in my ear for 40 minutes.  One woman sitting opposite was eating something I didn’t recognise, and the Amazonian-looking lady next to her suddenly got up, stomped up and down the aisle, screamed at her about making the train stink then jumped off at the next stop, still ranting.  Oh… and the bloke on my right was reading the bible.  Out loud. [Read more…]

Art, soundbites and no naked ladies

I’m whizzing through my Master’s Degree at a speed of energy-saving-low-efficiency light.  This time next year I’ll (hopefully) have an MA Ed and be qualified to lecture in a university.  Not that I’ll have much time to do that, but three years ago when I started it I wanted to teach art history and architecture. [Read more…]

Web designers, unmade beds and Blondie

My accountant commented this week that I seem to have recently developed a thing for web designers. Meeting interesting people for coffee isn’t developing a ‘thing’, is it??  Well anyway, it’s hardly surprising as I’ve been promoting myself as a website writer.  But spending time with designers does make me wonder how different my life might have turned out if I’d taken up my place at art school instead of backing out at the last minute in favour of the A levels that I didn’t even take in the end. [Read more…]